This Day In History: The Pilgrims Depart for America

Hello, dear readers!  This Day In History returns with its second installment, this one a bit lighter than the fiery end of the Intrepid.

This day, 393 years ago, The Mayflower set sail from Plymouth, England, to the New World.  Over one hundred Pilgrims set sail, intent to escape the religious policies of Europe and establish a colony where they were safe from the politics of England while retaining their cultural identity.

I’m sure all of you know the story.  Plymouth became the second oldest English-speaking settlement in the modern United States, being integral in elementary school lessons on the history and origins of Thanksgiving.

Interestingly, this venture by these settlers resulted in the Mayflower Compact, a document that greatly aided in promoting self-rule in the Americas and may have been the first written constitution to exist in human history.

To think of the effect that single ship and her passengers and crew had on human history is almost mind-boggling.

And to think, all of those results had foundations set 393 years ago, on the first day on the famed voyage of the Mayflower.

~Nick

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3 comments on “This Day In History: The Pilgrims Depart for America
  1. […] This Day In History: The Pilgrims Depart for America (recklesshistorians.wordpress.com) […]

  2. […] This Day In History: The Pilgrims Depart for America (recklesshistorians.wordpress.com) […]

  3. […] This Day In History: The Pilgrims Depart for America (recklesshistorians.wordpress.com) […]

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