Blog Archives

My Mom the Historian

It’s been a while since my last post.  With the craziness of Residence Life training, I’ve found myself constantly on the go.  It is nice to be able to sit down and do a bit of refreshing writing before the

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Posted in Some Of The History We Write, Stories Of Other Historians, Teaching History

What About All The King’s Men?

The more I read books by Edmund Morgan, the more I am captivated by his narrative and find significant power behind his historical arguments.  The Birth of the Republic, 1763-89, is no exception to this rule. I bought this book

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Posted in Colonial America, Historical Finds, Some Of The History We Write, Stories Of Events, Thoughts from Other Historians

Get Off My Colonial Lawn!

That’s the phrase I kept jokingly throwing around in my head as I’ve been reading Edmund Morgan’s The Birth of the Republic, 1763-89.  I took a course on colonial America this past year which really sparked my interest in this time

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Posted in Colonial America, Some Of The History We Write

R.I.P. Edmund Morgan

Hello friends, if you haven’t already heard the sad news a Megafigure in the field of history passed away a few days ago.  Edmund Morgan was a historian that I was just introduced to this past year.  His book American Slavery,

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Posted in Historical Finds, Some Of The History We Write, Stories Of Other Historians, Thoughts from Other Historians

Final Thoughts on “The Landscape of History”

Well friends, I just finished The Landscape of History by John Gaddis.  Certain parts of the book were really good, and one part left me scratching my head. The book did a really fine job going into aspects of the historical

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Posted in Some Of The History We Write, Stories Of Other Historians, Teaching History, The Ways Historians Think, Thoughts from Other Historians

Evaluating my current love affair with bookstores

Very early on in childhood, I can always remember be fascinated with bookstores. Although not always called the biggest reader, I loved perusing the stacks of historical non-fiction stacks and thinking about topics ranging from Lincoln’s Assassination to the roots

Posted in Some Of The History We Write, Some Simple Rants On History, Stories Of Events, Thoughts from Other Historians, Uncategorized

Just Some Undergrad Thoughts on Wineburg’s Chapter 1

Hi friends, So I finally have had enough time off of work to get to finish chapter 1 of Sam Wineburg’s Historical Thinking and Other Unnatural Acts, and I have just really been prompted to think about a few things in

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Posted in Some Of The History We Write, Some Simple Rants On History, Stories Of Other Historians, Teaching History, The Ways Historians Think, Thoughts from Other Historians

Gilbert Tennent and some thoughts on Colonial America’s Anti-Catholicism

Hi friends, So for Colonial America this past semester, I had to tell the story of a primary source document.  I found this interesting sermon by a Great Awakening pastor named Gilbert Tennent.  He preached a sermon on English exceptionalism

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Posted in Historical Finds, Some Of The History We Write, Stories Of Events

I’m A Historian, Not A Jeopardy Contestant

My friends, often times when I tell people I study history one response I hear is “Oh I like history, I’m just not good with dates,” to which my response is “Yeah me either.”  Though that response I give is

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Posted in Some Of The History We Write, Some Simple Rants On History, Teaching History, The Ways Historians Think, Thoughts from Other Historians

The English Civil War: Was It A Revolution?

Well friends, Today in one of my classes, we had a spirited debate on if the English Civil War was or was not revolutionary.  While some saw it as Parliament asserting its right as an institution, I was a little

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Posted in Some Of The History We Write, Some Simple Rants On History, Stories Of Events

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